Winds Curtail Things Again

From Kyle of Lochalsh, it was just a short hop, of about an hour, over to Uags bothy and we were escorted part way by porpoises and maybe something splashier (dolphins?) in the distance.

Uags Bothy on arrival

Uags Bothy on arrival

It was great to arrive at such a nice spot knowing there would be no need to camp and dryness and warmth were just a few minutes away. Two Dutch paddlers arrived at same time, having turned back from travels further north, reasoning that the comfy bothy they had enjoyed the night before was much more appealing that more hours against winds ending under canvas. They looked cold and by the time we were moved in, they had done likewise, and were already changed in to warm down jackets and had mackerel they had caught, frying.

Our own food was soon on and after eating, it was outside for a quick wander about to take in the last of daylight and views then sleep, interrupted only occasionally by weather related noise in the roof, which confirmed camping would definitely have been less pleasant than a night in such a nice bothy.

Uags next morning

Uags next morning

IMG_7684

Threatening clouds over Loch Kishorn

Threatening clouds over Loch Kishorn

That overnight, heavy rain had the place saturated next morning, with puddles everywhere on the grass. However, it was sunny and the water looked nice and calm, great conditions for our crossing to the Crowlins. It did indeed prove to be easy paddling to the Crowlins, but the water was too low to pass through the narrow, natural harbour, separating the two largest islands. In any case, one skerry in the middle was covered in seals, which we’d never get past without disturbing. Instead, we followed the west coast up to most northern and smaller island for a tea break before our crossing to Rassay for a scheduled meet-up.

The sea and winds had already changed by the time we set off, but all the way across those winds and waves grew in strength and size – all good fun till it got too hard for our intended nothern continuation up Rassay’s east coast. Dolphins were having fun, surfing in waves in front of us – a fleeting but lovely encounter. We re-grouped at the bottom of Rassay and lounged for ages out the wind and in lovely sunshine before changing our destination to Scalpay, just a couple of kilometres south, and downwind.

View West from The Crowlins

View West from The Crowlins

Rest spot at Rassay's Southern End

Rest spot at Rassay’s Southern End

Fossil on same beach

Fossil on same beach

A pleasant evening of getting warm and eating followed. Next day, we set off clockwise round Scalpay, with remnants of generated swell on the northeast coast, largely easy though and once round the southen end, we were sheltered. Good wildlife on display – lots of otters and heron and a sea eagle – and great views of mountain scenery – Broadford Hills and Trotternish Ridge – to keep us entertained along the way.

Lonely ruin on Scalpay's North Coast

Lonely ruin on Scalpay’s North Coast

IMG_7771

Family of three otters on Scalpay's East coast

Family of three otters on Scalpay’s East coast

IMG_7773

View North to Trotternish Ridge and Old Man of Storr

View North to Skye’s Trotternish Ridge and Old Man of Storr

Advertisements

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: